Without such an ontological form [nature] could in no way be objectively determined

<nb>He is interested in
the necessary ontological formations that an objective reality is to
have if it is to be cognizable and if it is to be grounded in cognizable
truths valid in themselves, in rigorous sciences.</nb> <nb>That our nature is
spatiotemporal and obeys purely mathematical laws, that it is causal
25 and that an empirical science—which, however, is guided by math-
ematical method—is valid for it—this is no contingent /factum/. But
only when lawfulnesses of this type exist, something like a world
of objects can be experienced and determined from experience.</nb>
<nb>Thus, only for this reason can the cognizing agent rightfully claim to
30 presuppose a true nature in his cognitions, because the experienced
objects, in the manner in which they are experienced, have a mathe-
matical and natural-scientific structure. Without | such an ontological VII, 227/228
form [nature] could in no way be objectively determined.</nb>

Edmund Husserl, First Philosophy, 410

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