what is real is nothing but a constituted noematic unity

Thus the fundamental thesis of “transcendental idealism” is obtained:
what is real is nothing but a constituted noematic unity (individual) of
a special kind of sense which in its being and quality /(Sosein)
/results from a set of experiences of a special kind and is quite
impossible without them. Entities of this kind exist only for the pure
transcendental ego which experiences such a set of perceptions. The
existence of what is perceived (of the perceived as such) is nothing “in
itself” /(an sich) /but only something “for somebody,” for the
experiencing ego. “Streichen wir das reine Bewusstsein, so streichen wir
die Welt” (“If we exclude pure consciousness then we exclude the world”)
is the famous thesis of Husserlian transcendental idealism which he was
already constantly repeating in lectures during his Göttingen period.

ROMAN INGARDEN, /On the Motives which led Husserl to Transcendental Idealism/,  /Translated from the Polish by /ARNOR HANNIBALSSON, p. 21

Thereby the main thesis of transcendental idealism presents itself, that
the being of the real world, given to us in an experiential way is
dependent on the being and process of the pure constituting
consciousness without which it would not exist at all and, secondly,
that it is generally awkward even to ask about the existence of the
world “in itself” as it transcends the real sense of transcendental
constitution whose results create the basis for every inquiry and
determine the sense of our questions. The whole world given to us
phenomenally in experience (and all the more the world of physics and
microphysics construed by thought on the basis of experience) is nothing
but a certain definite layer in the process of constitution, a certain
phase of “objectification” after which other and further
objectifications of a higher order succeed, the results of which are,
e.g. the world of microphysics.

ROMAN INGARDEN, /On the Motives which led Husserl to Transcendental Idealism/,  /Translated from the Polish by /ARNOR HANNIBALSSON, p. 27

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